Friday, October 10, 2014

guess

Tomorrow is the Step Up for Down Syndrome walk for the Down Syndrome Association of West Michigan (DSAWM). It is SUPER HERO inspired. I have some tricks up my sleeves, wait until you see tomorrow's blog post!!! Can you guess what I have up my sleeve?

Mom's notes -
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition. The following resources will help you understand this process:
Foundations of Transition for Young Children - Effective Transition Practices in Early Childhood.video
Part C: The Transition Process and Lead Agency Notification. This Training Module 8 takes a detailed look at what the Part C regulations require in terms of the transition planning and activities that must occur from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Part C: Development of the Transition Plan. This Training Module 9 focuses on the development of a transition plan for the exiting toddler from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Transition to Preschool. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY (closing September 2014).
Transition of Young Children in Early Childhood Programs from CONNECT: The Center to Mobilize Early Childhood Knowledge from the Child Development Institute at UNC. This training module is about transition from Part C of IDEA (infants and toddlers- birth to three) to Part B (young children - three to six) programs.
Transitioning from Early Intervention. A booklet about leaving early intervention services at age 3 and transitioning to pre-school or other programs. Compiled by parents in New Jersey.
Early Transitions for Children and Families: Transitions from Infant/Toddler Services to Preschool Education. This ERIC Digest covers transition issues such as achieving successful transitions, what influences the process, strategies and processes.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.Ut4eBXL3.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
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Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf
What is Early Intervention?
Early intervention is the process of providing services, education and support to young children who are deemed to have an established condition, those who are evaluated and deemed to have a diagnosed physical or mental condition (with a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay), an existing delay or a child who is *at-risk of developing a delay or special need that may affect their development or impede their education. The purpose of early intervention is to lessen the effects of the disability or delay. Services are designed to identify and meet a child's needs in five developmental areas, including: physical development, cognitive development, communication, social or emotional development, and adaptive development.
Early intervention programs and services may occur in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on natural environments. These programs and/or services are proven to be most effective when started as soon as the delay or disability is identified.
Child Find information and resources from Wrightslaw.
Child Find is a component of IDEA that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth to 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.
*The at-risk category depends on the state's eligibility determination process and whether it includes children who are at-risk. States are given the discretion of including children at-risk in their state plans.
Natural Environments
Part C of IDEA requires "to the maximum extent appropriate to the needs of the child, early intervention services must be provided in natural environments, including the home and community settings in which children without disabilities participate." (34 CFR §303.12(b))
By definition, natural environments mean "settings that are natural or normal for the child's age peers who have no disabilities." (34 CFR §303.18)
The exception to the rule reads "the provision of early intervention services for any infant or toddler with a disability occurs in a setting other than a natural environment that is most appropriate, as determined by the parent and the individualized family service plan team, only when early intervention cannot be achieved satisfactorily for the infant or toddler in a natural environment."
The provision of early intervention services taking place in natural environments is not just a guiding principle or suggestion, it is a legal requirement.
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Preschool, OSEP Letter, 02/29/12. This OSEP letter reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements in section 612(a)(5) of the IDEA apply to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. 20 USC §1412(a)(5). The statutory provision on LRE does not distinguish between school-aged and preschool-aged children and therefore, applies equally to all preschool children with disabilities.
To Top
Part C of IDEA: The Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities
Congress established the Part C (Early Intervention) program in 1986 in recognition of "an urgent and substantial need" to:
  • enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities;
  • reduce educational costs by minimizing the need for special education through early intervention;
  • minimize the likelihood of institutionalization, and maximize independent living; and,
  • enhance the capacity of families to meet their child's needs.
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families. In order for a state to participate in the program it must assure that early intervention will be available to every eligible child and its family. Also, the governor must designate a lead agency to receive the grant and administer the program, and appoint an Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC), including parents of young children with disabilities, to advise and assist the lead agency. Currently, all states and eligible territories are participating in the Part C program. Annual funding to each state is based upon census figures of the number of children, birth through 2, in the general population.
In 2004, President Bush signed legislation reauthorizing IDEA. The current IDEA 2004 Statute (P.L. 108-446) for Part C (PDF) contain many requirements states have to meet, including specifying the minimum components of comprehensive statewide early intervention system. States have some discretion in setting the criteria for child eligibility, including whether or not to serve at risk children. As a result, definitions of eligibility differ significantly from state to state. States also differ concerning which state agency has been designated "lead agency" for the Part C program. In fact, statewide early intervention systems differ in many ways from state to state. (source)
Update: On September 28, 2011, the IDEA 2004 Part C Final Regulations governing the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities were published in the Federal Register. These regulations are effective on October 28, 2011. Regulations & Analysis of Comments and Changes (Commentary) were published in the Federal Register, Vol. 76, No. 188, September 28, 2011, p. 60140. PDF Format
Part C (Birth - 2 years old) IDEA 2004: Building the Legacy. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) Part C of the IDEA website to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to Part C.
Building the Legacy of our Youngest Children with Disabilities. Training Guide on Part C from the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
Evaluation and Assessments
Under IDEA, evaluation and assessments are to be provided at no cost to the parent. Evaluation refers to the process used by the multidisciplinary team (qualified people with training and experience in the areas of speech and language skills, physical abilities, hearing and vision, and other important areas of development) to find out whether or not your child is eligible for early intervention services. As part of the evaluation, the multidisciplinary team will observe, interact, and use other tools or methods to gather information on your child. These procedures will help the team find out how your child functions. The team will then meet with you to discuss whether the findings mean that your child is eligible for services under Part C.
Eligibility for Part C
Part C eligibility is determined by each state's definition of developmental delay and whether it includes children at risk for disabilities in the eligibility formula. An important part of the evaluation process for infants and toddlers (ages 0 - 36 months) includes informed clinical opinion of professionals experienced with the development of very young children. States have been given a lot of discretion for determining eligibility for entry into their programs. If your child is determined to be eligible, the next step is to create an IFSP.
The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
An Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) documents and guides the early intervention process for children with disabilities and their families. The IFSP is the vehicle through which effective early intervention is implemented in accordance with Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It contains information about the services necessary to facilitate a child's development and enhance the family's capacity to facilitate the child's development. Through the IFSP process, family members and service providers work as a team to plan, implement, and evaluate services specific to the family's concerns, priorities, and available resources. (source) A service coordinator then helps the family by coordinating the services outlined in the IFSP. Download the Model IFSP Form published by the U.S. Department of Education.
Writing the IFSP. From the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), the legacy resource for NICHCY.
The State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC)
Each state has a State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). According to IDEA, the function of the ICC is to "advise and assist the lead agency in the performance of the responsibilities set forth in Section 635(a)(10) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, particularly the identification of the sources of fiscal and other support for services for early intervention programs, assignment of financial responsibility to the appropriate agency, and the promotion of the interagency agreements; advise and assist the lead agency in the preparation of applications and amendments thereto; advise and assist the State educational agency regarding the transition of toddlers with disabilities to preschool and other appropriate services; and, prepare and submit to the Governor and to the Federal Secretary of Education on the status of early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families operated within the State."
Transitioning out of Part C and into Part B (Special Education)
Your team (including parents) should start preparing the child for transition (if applicable) into Part B services around the age of 30-32 months (and no less than 3 months prior to the child's 3rd birthday). All children will not be eligible to enter into preschool special education programs. A transition planning meeting will be held to discuss next steps, particularly, how to prepare your child for the transition out of Part C. An exit IEP is held which determines the services that your child will receive after the transition.
- See more at: http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/ei.index.htm#sthash.NHAvBP2Z.dpuf